Last Updated: Tue Nov 02, 2010 21:03 pm (KSA) 18:03 pm (GMT)

One killed, 4 injured in Israel's strike on tunnels

A Palestinian youth climbs out of a smuggling tunnel between Egypt and the southern Gaza Strip (File)
A Palestinian youth climbs out of a smuggling tunnel between Egypt and the southern Gaza Strip (File)

Israeli warplanes attacked two smuggling tunnels along the Gaza Strip border with Egypt on Wednesday, killing one tunneller and wounding four others, as Israeli rights groups revealed that hundreds of Palestinians are being held by Israel without trial in violation of the international laws.

An Israeli army spokeswoman said the attack came in response to a rocket fired by Gaza fighters into southern Israel late on Tuesday. It landed in an open field causing no casualties, the army said.

The Palestinian medical source said one Palestinian was killed and four others were wounded. No Palestinian group claimed responsibility for firing the rocket.

Rocket attacks on Israel have tapered off since a December-January war between Israel and Gaza armed groups. Israeli defense officials have credited Islamist Movement Hamas, which controls the coastal enclave, for stopping fighter from launching them.

Held without trial

 Extensive detentions breaches international law which permits use of administrative detention only in very extreme cases 
Israeli rights groups

Two Israeli human rights groups meanwhile said on Wednesday that Israel is currently holding 335 Palestinians without trial in breach of international law.

Of the 335 Palestinians held in so-called administrative detention, one is a minor and three are women.

One of the prisoners has been held for more than four and a half years without trial and another 28 have been in detention for between two and four years, HaMoked and B'Tselem said.

Israel's policy of "extensive detentions breaches international law which permits use of administrative detention only in very extreme cases," the groups said.

They said judicial reviews of the cases of Palestinians held under administrative orders present "a semblance of a fair judicial process, but in fact denies the detainees any possibility to reasonably defend themselves against the allegations made against them."

In most case, judges declare evidence to be privileged and rely on reports by the Israeli security agencies submitted in the absence of the detainee or his attorney.

"Consequently, the detainees cannot refute the allegations or offer alternative evidence," the groups said.

Between August 2008 and July 2009, military court judges approved 95 percent of the detention orders brought to them, they said.

"HaMoked and B'Tselem call on the government of Israel to release the administrative detainees or to prosecute them according to the standards of international law regarding due process."

Administrative detention is based on a 1945 British mandate law.

Comments »

Post Your Comment »

Social Media »