Last Updated: Wed Mar 16, 2011 11:37 am (KSA) 08:37 am (GMT)

Actors back Palestinian-Israeli film 'Miral' at UN

lMiral deals with the story of 2 Palestinian women after the creation of Israel in 1948
lMiral deals with the story of 2 Palestinian women after the creation of Israel in 1948

Sean Penn and Robert De Niro joined stars who appeared on Monday at the U.N. headquarters for the U.S. premiere of a contested movie on the Middle East conflict that Israel tried to get cancelled.

Penn, De Niro, Josh Brolin and Steve Buscemi turned out to support award-winning American-Jewish director Julian Schnabel at the premiere of "Miral," the story of two Palestinian women after the creation of Israel in 1948.

The Israeli mission to the U.N. had said that showing the movie in the U.N. General Assembly hall was "clearly a politicized decision" that "shows poor judgment and a lack of even-handedness." Haim Waxman, Israel's deputy ambassador, said, "We are not aware of any other films with such contentious political content that have received this kind of endorsement from the president of the G.A."

But U.N. General Assembly president Joseph Deiss of Switzerland turned down the Israeli request to cancel the event. A spokesman said Deiss hoped that showing the film would "contribute" to a settlement in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Schnabel, who was awarded the best director at Cannes in 2007 for "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly," praised the U.N. decision at the start of the film and called his film a "cry for peace."

The film, with Indian actress Freida Pinto of "Slumdog Millionaire" fame in the lead role, is based on an autobiographical novel by Palestinian journalist Rula Jebreal that traces the Arab-Israeli from a Palestinian perspective.

Like Jebreal, the lead character Miral grows up in an orphanage in East Jerusalem set up by a socialite from a wealthy Palestinian family, who one morning in 1948 came across 55 children who escaped a village taken over by radical Jewish militants.

Adapted with the author, Schnabel's film, shot in Israel and the West Bank, traces the lives of the two women from the establishment of the orphanage until the Oslo peace accords of 1993.

"The whole point is because I'm an American Jew, and that's why it touched me because it's a big part of my life," Schnabel said. "It's important for Muslims to hear that, it's important for Jewish people to hear that, and for Israel and for people everywhere."

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