Last Updated: Thu Jul 28, 2011 15:00 pm (KSA) 12:00 pm (GMT)

Muslim-hating killer expresses divergent views about Jews and Israel. By Ray Moseley

Blood stained personal belongings are seen at the scene of a powerful explosion that rocked central Oslo. (File photo)
Blood stained personal belongings are seen at the scene of a powerful explosion that rocked central Oslo. (File photo)

In his rambling, 1,500-page manifesto, which he posted online just before killing 76 people in Norway last Friday, Anders Behring Breivik expressed divergent opinions about Jews and the state of Israel.

On the one hand, he applauded Israel and said it was a victim of “cultural Marxists” who “see Israel as a ‘racist’ state.” The movement of which he claimed to be a part, determined to rid Europe of Muslims and fight for “a Judeo-Christian Europe,” was “rapidly developing into a pro-Israel, anti-Jihad alliance,” he wrote.

On the other hand, he said the United States “has a considerable Jewish problem” because its population includes more than six million Jews, whereas Western Europe with just one million Jews has no Jewish problem.

He urges his supporters not to “make the same mistake” as the Nazi Party in Germany did. “Never target a Jew because he is a Jew, but rather because he is a category A or B traitor,” he said. “Please learn the difference between a nation-wrecking multiculturalist Jew and a conservative Jew,” he wrote.

The manifesto defines category A traitors as heads of state, government ministers and directors. Category B are politicians, journalists, teachers, cartoonists, doctors and church leaders. These he sees as “enablers of Islamization” by allowing Muslim immigration and supporting a multicultural society.

The Jerusalem Post editorialized that, while it deplored Mr. Breivik’s crimes, a nonviolent campaign against multiculturalism has legitimacy. “Discontent with multiculturalism’s failure must not be delegitimized or mistakenly portrayed as an opinion held by only the most extremist elements of the Right,” it said.

Similarly, the American literary critic and poet Bruce Bawer, who opposes multiculturalism, noted in the Wall Street Journal that he had repeatedly warned that a rightwing extremist might use violence to address “legitimate concerns about genuine problems.”

In one of his books, Mr. Bawer said Europe’s politically correct culture defends Islamic fundamentalism, and suggests that the solution to the problem is “deporting planeloads (of Muslims) every day.”

On Monday a court in Oslo ordered Mr. Breivik held in solitary confinement for four weeks and held in police custody for an additional four weeks while his crimes are investigated. He claimed in court that he had been aided by “two more cells” but did not elaborate.

A principal theme of Mr. Breivik’s manifesto concerns a secret society he claims was founded in London in 2002 and is called the Knights Templar. The name refers to an organization that was one of the most skilled fighting units in the Christian Crusades in the Middle Ages and that existed for almost two centuries.

He described himself as one of 12 founding members of the modern Knights Templar and said he believed the others are plotting attacks similar to the one he carried out in Oslo, killing eight people with a car bomb and 68 others, mostly children, by shooting them.

The other founders, he said, include English Protestant, French Catholic and Serbian Greek Orthodox believers, but he gave no names.

His manifesto referred to an English “mentor” named Richard, who he said wrote a tract founding the modern Knights Templars. The British government has said it is investigating possible links between Mr. Breivik and the far right in England.

“As a Knight you are operating as a jury, judge and executioner on behalf of all free Europeans,” he wrote. “There are situations in which cruelty is necessary, and refusing to apply necessary cruelty is a betrayal of the people whom you wish to protect.”

He argued that his battle should not spare women, as they would not hesitate to kill the so-called Knights. “You must therefore embrace and familiarize yourself with the concept of killing women, even very attractive women,” he said.

Mr. Breivik expresses admiration not just for the ancient Knights Templars but for another historical figure, Vlad III, prince of Wallachia, otherwise known as Vlad the Impaler or Dracula.

“Romanian crusader Vlad the Impaler was a genius of psychological warfare,” he wrote. He said Vlad faced “external Islamic aggressors threatening his country” and was “a real master of STAGING cruelty to obtain maximum effect.”

(Ray Moseley is a London-based former chief European correspondent of the Chicago Tribune. He can be reached at rnmoseley@aol.com.)

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